Friday, April 9, 2021

Innov8tif's OkayDoc Named as Top Winner for Huawei Spark Malaysia's Tech Competition

This press release was published on 8th Apr 2021 on Huawei.

[Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 8 APRIL 2021] Innov8tif emerged the winner for its OkayDoc platform today in Huawei Technologies (Malaysia) Sdn Bhd’s Huawei Spark competition, with DoctorOnCall placing second and MHub coming in third.

OkayDoc is a set of computer vision algorithm that automates ID authentication and prevents fraud in e-KYC (electronic know your customer) through visual zone inspections, security feature detection and content tampering checks.

DoctorOnCall delivers healthcare services like online doctors, specialists, pharmacists, screenings and vaccines directly to users. They have Artificial Intelligence (AI) doctors and 5G Internet of Things (IoT) Pods that aim to improve healthcare for at least 700 million people in Southeast Asia.

MHUB is the leading end-to-end property sales transaction platform that speeds up and simplifies the property sales cycle by connecting developers, agents, banks, lawyers and buyers.

Source: Huawei.com

The companies were among the 10 finalists shortlisted from more than 140 entries in the Huawei Spark competition.

The competition is part of the Huawei Spark programme, which aims to incubate and accelerate company growth and build an ecosystem for businesses in the Asia Pacific (APAC) region.

Huawei Spark is held in collaboration with the Malaysia Digital Economy Corporation (MDEC), TusStar (Malaysia) as incubator partner, and powered by TM ONE – the enterprise and public sector business solutions arm of Telekom Malaysia Berhad (TM) – through its α Edge (pronounced as Alpha Edge) Cloud platform.

The 10 companies that made it to the top were:

  1. BookDoc
  2. Boss Boleh
  3. DoctorOnCall
  4. Fuhla
  5. Innov8tif
  6. Mhub
  7. MSA - Mobile Sharing Assistant
  8. OrangeFIN Asia
  9. Orpheus Capital
  10. SmartPeep

A five member panel of judges comprising representatives from MDEC, TM ONE, TusStar and Huawei decided on the winners after a pitching session by the finalists.

Launched virtually in Malaysia in November last year, the Huawei Spark programme is a hybrid accelerator programme to support deep tech companies in Asia Pacific , with a focus on firms that use 5G, Artificial Intelligence (AI) / Machine Learning & Analytics, Internet of Things (IoT), Edge Computing and Software as a Service (SaaS) applications, leveraging Huawei’s technological and innovation leadership.

Click here to continue reading the full press release.

Friday, April 2, 2021

Digital Fraud Tactics that may be on the Rise in 2021

Image source: Pexels.com


Because of the rapid rise in digital use, fraudsters can rapidly find new ways to steal money, taking advantage of customers' lack of experience with digital platforms and many businesses' resource constraints. The Federal Trade Commission estimated that between January 2020 and early January 2021, consumers filed over 275,000 complaints, leading to more than $210 million in losses related to COVID-19. As a result, companies must predict new fraud strategies to avoid damages and protect consumers from issues such as identity theft through new technologies such as biometric security.

Few could have expected the issues of 2020. As lockdown measures restricted conventional modes of business, the COVID-19 pandemic ushered in a time of rampant digitization to allow remote processes and ensure business continuity. This change exacerbated trends that were already in motion to a large extent. Much remains elusive when we look forward to 2021 and the post-COVID market world. Here are some prominent security, technology, and industry-related issues that are expected for the coming year. Understanding these could help people who work in financial institutions and banks better prepare for cybersecurity threats and concerns in 2021.

There are five fraud risks that companies should be aware of this year to help them prepare for fraudulent activity in 2021.


1. Biometric identity fraud

With biometric technology, many effective software and mobile applications across a variety of industries can be found. Unfortunately, such budding technological advancements are not excluded when it comes to threats from cybercrime. Fraudsters are now likely to utilize AI to break through traditional security solutions such as passwords, captcha features and even biometric authentication measures. There's even the possibility of the use of deepfake technology to bypass authentication to gain access to systems and personal information. Another example of rising fraud trends is the use of social media filters - those which can imitate or swap facial features to another person's likeness. These facial expression recreation algorithms are based on AI components, which is what makes the creation of real-time photorealistic avatars possible. Sometimes, voice capabilities are even present. The bad news is that hackers can use all of these great features to bypass most non-presential biometric authentication solutions.


2. Chaos caused by the global COVID-19 crisis 

Taking advantage of the volatile economic crisis, opportunistic hackers have engaged in even more fraudulent behaviour. Stealing stimulus checks and unemployment insurance, collecting compensation for dubious COVID-19 treatments, duping victims into contributing to fictitious charities, and other schemes are among the strategies used. In the first half of 2020, there were 1.1 billion fraud attacks, which is more than double the number of attacks in the second half of 2019. According to the Federal Trade Commission, COVID-19-related fraud has cost Americans $145 million. 


3. Expect frequent hacks of voice-capturing devices

In 2021, as more businesses and financial institutions use voice authentication, expect an increase in hacks of voice-capturing devices with microphones that record users' authentication information. If used by financial institutions, this information may be especially vulnerable to attacks because it could contain confidential information such as account numbers, social security numbers, or other personally identifiable information.


4.“Too Good to Be True” COVID solutions

Experian anticipates that fraudsters will continue to exploit nervous and vulnerable customers and businesses as vaccines are distributed and quick COVID-19 testing becomes more widely available. Everyone should be on the lookout for scammers who use the promise of at-home test kits, vaccinations, and treatments as a cover for sophisticated phishing, telemarketing fraud, and social engineering schemes.